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lukebrown

a regular writer and co-founder of Polo's Bastards Adventure Travel.

Fishy Farmers

Well, there you go. According to a study done by the Mississippi State University, Vietnamese catfish is tastier and just as safe as catfish farmed in the United States. But then, if you heard about the “catfish wars” a few years ago, you probably already knew that.

Pakistan: Ghosts

It seemed to weigh heavily on him, this bespectacled middle-aged man opposite me. Alternately hunching his shoulders when lapsing into deep thought, and then rising up again when making a vital point, he would continue to talk, at times lowering his voice to a whisper, conscious not to allow his voice to reach the surrounds…

India and Pakistan: An afternoon at the circus

Cross late in the afternoon from Pakistan into India through the Wagah border point, complete immigration and customs formalities, walk a further couple of hundred metres down the road and you’ll find crowds of people, predominantly Indians, assembled outside a large closed gate. They are not touts awaiting tourists leaving Pakistan; you’ll find them a…

Book Review: “Setting the East Ablaze” by Peter Hopkirk

(Oxford University Press – 252 pages) Reviewer – Luke Brown Having seized power of Russia in the 1917 Revolution and being subsequently disappointed that it didn’t have a snowballing effect on Europe, the murderous, tyrannical, communist dictator Lenin decided that it was through the East that he could hope to conquer the West. As Britain…

Book Review: “The Gilgit Game” by John Keay

(Oxford University Press – 277 pages) Reviewer – Luke Brown Posted: 29 September, 2003 During the 19th century the Great Game (see Peter Hopkirk’s excellent book by the same title for more details) was being played between two imperial powers, Russia and Britain, for control of Central Asia. British India was deemed to be under…

Book Review: “The Great Game” by Peter Hopkirk

(Oxford University Press – 562 pages) Reviewer – Luke Brown Posted: 15 September, 2003 Although the phrase “The Great Game” was immortalised in Rudyard Kipling’s turn of the century adventure novel, Kim, it originated decades earlier, its source Captain Arthur Conolly, one if its early players. The phrase refers to that period in Central Asian…